Articles

THE ANATOMY OF LYMPH VESSELS IN RELATION TO FUNCTION

Authors
  • F Huth
  • D Bernhardt

Abstract

The essential functions of the lymphatic system are to pick up large molecules, particles and excess fluid and to transport them from the peripheral connective tissue to the venous system. Within normal tissue most of the lymphatics are collapsed, (Fig. 1a). They can, therefore, hardly be differentiated light microscopically from blood capillaries or from septal connective tissue. Various techniques have been used to visualize the lymph vessels within organs and extremities. Retrograde injection of air, indian ink, different proteins and dyes, silver nitrate, mercury, ferritin, acrylic resins etc., often lead to ruptures of the thinwalled and vulnerable lymphatics, there by causing interstitial dye extravasates to be falsely interpreted as lymphatics (Wutzer 1834, Most 1908, Bartels 1909, Baum 1928, Grau 1943, Jancso et al. 1952, Mori 1963, Mori et al. 1964, Leak and Burke 1966, Viragh et al. 1966, Bergstrom and Werner 1966, Kuprianov 1969, Casley-Smith 1969, Gerteis 1972). Injection of lymph-specific dyes such as patent blue as well as different tracer techniques demonstrate sectoral lymph vascular branches but never the complete lymph drainage of tissue or organs. Application of hydrogen peroxide demonstrates the lymph vessels below mesothelial surfaces; total lymphangiography of an organ was not possible with this method (Magnus 1922, 1923, Hass 1936, Johnson and Blake 1966; Johnson 1969).

How to Cite:

Huth, F. & Bernhardt, D., (1977) “THE ANATOMY OF LYMPH VESSELS IN RELATION TO FUNCTION”, Lymphology 10(2), 54-61.

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Published on
01 Oct 1977
Peer Reviewed