Articles

THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE LYMPHOEDEMA WITH PANTOTHENIC ACID AND PYRIDOXINE: AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPICAL INVESTIGATION

Authors
  • JR Casley-Smith
  • M Foldi
  • OT Zoltan

Abstract

Lymphoedema which is caused by impedance of lymph outflow from a region, is becoming recognised as the origin, or a contributing factor of many diseases. It has been shown that surgical obstruction of the cervical lymphatics results in Lymphostatic Encephalopathy. This is characterised by striking central nervous signs and a series of morphological alterations in the brain and the eye, accompanied by a lymphoedema of the muzzle (1-8). Surprisingly, it was found that these signs and alterations can be largely and safely prevented by treatment with high doses of Pantothenic acid and Pyridoxine (9, 10). This has been established in a number of species, including the rat, the dog and man.

The electron microscope was used to help investigate how this treatment works. Observations were made on the lymphatics in the tongues of normal rats, of some whose cervical lymphatics had been ligated, and of others with a similar operation but with the treatment as well. The tongue was chosen since it is drained by the same lymphatics as is the brain, yet it possesses the normal, small, "initial" lymphatics which are not present in the brain. The plentiful supply of lymphatics in the fascial planes of the tongue made it easy to find enough of them. Preliminary experiments on the skin of the cheek showed similar results to those reported here, but a relative paucity of lymphatics made the findings less reliable.

How to Cite:

Casley-Smith, J. & Foldi, M. & Zoltan, O., (1969) “THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE LYMPHOEDEMA WITH PANTOTHENIC ACID AND PYRIDOXINE: AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPICAL INVESTIGATION”, Lymphology 2(2), 63-71.

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Published on
27 Sep 1969
Peer Reviewed