Articles

THE DISTRIBUTION AND ULTRASTRUCTURE OF RENAL LYMPHATIC VESSELS PROLIFERATING IN RESPONSE TO KIDNEY INJURY IN THE DOG

Authors
  • RE Nordquist
  • RD Bell
  • RJ Sinclair
  • MJ Keyl

Abstract

A study of lymphatic proliferation around the sites of chronic injury has clarified the process by which new lymphatic vessels are formed.  Sterile wooden splinters were introduced through the renal capsule into the cortex and the medulla. Retrograde carbon injection of lymphatic trunks four weeks after splinter implantation revealed a profusion of new lymphatic vessels in the renal cortex with an extension of these vessels into the outer medulla of the dog.  Ultrastructurally, these new lymphatic vessels were characterized by a large leading cell and absence of basement membrane and anchoring filaments. Carbon particles used as a lymphatic marker were found in both the lymphatic lumen and penetrating a small canal formed by the leading cell. Thus, the present study supports the hypothesis that new lymphatics arise from endothelial sprouts of pre-existing lymphatic vessels.

How to Cite:

Nordquist, R. & Bell, R. & Sinclair, R. & Keyl, M., (1974) “THE DISTRIBUTION AND ULTRASTRUCTURE OF RENAL LYMPHATIC VESSELS PROLIFERATING IN RESPONSE TO KIDNEY INJURY IN THE DOG”, Lymphology 7(1), p.32-36.

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Published on
26 Sep 1974
Peer Reviewed