Articles

ENVIRONMENTAL INDUCTION OF TUMOR PHENOTYPE IN A PUTATIVE KAPOSI SARCOMA PROGENITOR CELL

Authors
  • SR Mallery
  • LE Lantry
  • A Hegtvedt
  • A Lazo
  • LC Titterington
  • BL Hout
  • GP Brierley
  • RE Stephens

Abstract

Many features of AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma (AIDS-KS), e.g., multifocal lesional presentation at sites perfused by the microvasculature, suggest that AIDS-KS is initially a hyperplasia that subsequently progresses to a neoplasia. We propose that the unique AIDS environment, which contains high levels of circulating factors such as viral cytokines, is key in initiating the KS lesion. Further, we maintain that due to their physiological function, human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) are both likely target cells for the AIDS-related cytokines, and are putative AIDS-KS progenitor cells. Previously, we have shown that as a component of HMEC transition between proliferative and differentiated growth, HMECs modulate their nucleotide and glutathione levels. After attaining contact inhibition, HMECs enter a state of differentiation, which is characterized by cellular entrance into a G0, quiescent growth state, a decrease in cellular bioenergetic profiles, and spontaneous formation of microtubules. In contrast, when cultured in a "KS milieu", HMECs fail to differentiate. Instead, the "KS milieu" cultured cells assume a "growth relaxed" phenotype and demonstrate a lack of contact inhibition, loss of anchorage dependence, and retention of a "proliferative" bioenergetic profile despite culture confluence. Our results imply both that HMECs are responsive to AIDS-related cytokines, and that the local environment is key to instigating a relaxation of cellular growth controls.

How to Cite:

Mallery, S., Lantry, L., Hegtvedt, A., Lazo, A., Titterington, L., Hout, B., Brierley, G. & Stephens, R., (1994) “ENVIRONMENTAL INDUCTION OF TUMOR PHENOTYPE IN A PUTATIVE KAPOSI SARCOMA PROGENITOR CELL”, Lymphology 27(1), 45-48.

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Published on
07 Sep 1994
Peer Reviewed