Articles

THE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE LYMPH HEART IN THE DOMESTIC CHICKEN (GALLUS DOMESTICUS)

Authors
  • B Bischof
  • K-D Budras

Abstract

Although at the time of hatching, the lymph heart of the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus) is usually considered to have atrophied, our findings suggest otherwise. Apart from the lymphatic-venous (L-V) anastomoses between the thoracoabdominal lymph trunks and the superior vena cava in the chest, there are two other L-V anastomoses in the sacral region. These L-V communications connect the lymph heart with three inter-segmental veins and with the L-V sinus of the dura mater. The topography of the lymph heart was demonstrated using direct and indirect blue dye injections depending on the age of the chicken. Lymphatic continuity was noted up to the 15th week of age from lymphatics of the hindlimb into the lymph heart via the thoracoabdominal lymph trunk, including communications of the lymph heart with the venous system and dural sinus. At 16 weeks of age, lymph flow apparently ceases caudally, but continues superiorly into the venous system. In the egg, the lymph heart may help propel interstitial fluid in the motionless fetus. After hatching, the lymph heart may facilitate fluid propulsion through L-V communications in the spinal canal.

How to Cite:

Bischof, B. & Budras, K., (1993) “THE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE LYMPH HEART IN THE DOMESTIC CHICKEN (GALLUS DOMESTICUS)”, Lymphology 26(4), 177-185.

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Published on
10 Sep 1993
Peer Reviewed