Articles

CULTURED ENDOTHELIAL CELLS FROM LYMPHATICS OF NUDE MICE PARASITIZED BY BRUGIA MALAYI

Authors
  • BH Kwa
  • R Buck
  • JK Nayar
  • AC Vickery

Abstract

Endothelial cells from dilated inguinal lymphatics of congenitally athymic nude mice, parasitized by adult Brugia malayi, were placed in culture. Cells formed a loose monolayer and exhibited a typical cobblestone appearance. When microfilariae were present in cultures, they frequently appeared to be attached to the monolayer by one end. Approximately 75% of the primary explant cells were positive for Factor VIII-associated antigen, comparable to bovine artery endothelial cells used as a control. With few exceptions, cultures were uncontaminated with fibroblasts or other non-endothelial cell types. Large granular cells with characteristics of mononuclear/macrophage cells appeared in long term and unpassaged cultures. Cells remained viable in culture for an average of 60 days, 5 to 6 passages, before becoming highly vacuolated and assuming a rounded configuration. Viability of the cells was dependent upon heparin, serum and endothelial cell growth factor.

The propensity of the lymphatics of nude mice to become greatly dilated in the presence of viable adult worms of B. malayi will prove to be important not only for the study of the effects of the parasite and its products upon endothelial cells, but also because a source of murine lymphatic endothelial cells can be readily available for functional studies.

How to Cite:

Kwa, B. & Buck, R. & Nayar, J. & Vickery, A., (1991) “CULTURED ENDOTHELIAL CELLS FROM LYMPHATICS OF NUDE MICE PARASITIZED BY BRUGIA MALAYI”, Lymphology 24(1), 22-25.

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Published on
01 Oct 1991
Peer Reviewed