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TEACHER RESPONSE TO NON-NATIVE SELECTION ERRORS IN COLLEGE- LEVEL ESL FRESHMAN COMPOSITION

Abstract

Within a larger theoretical framework exploring the role of creative (i.e. rule based) and routine (e.g. conventionalized) language in L1/L2 use and acquisition, this exploratory pilot study examines an ESL instructor's perception of, and responses to, non native-like (i.e. non-routine) language selection at the sentence level in a college level ESL composition class. Three final student papers were analyzed to determine the degree to which the instructor addressed non-native selection errors (NNSEs). The instructor was interviewed regarding his perceptions of NNSEs and was also asked to participate in an error correction task. The data indicate that NNSEs were often not addressed in final drafts. Further, the error correction choices made by the instructor were a product of a) political beliefs regarding expectations for L2 learners of a global communication tool such as English, b) lack of perception of NNSEs, and c) underlying beliefs regarding second language acquisition and teachability of routine language. Finally, the study design was critiqued and the implications for teacher training, both pedagogical and sociopolitical, are discussed.

How to Cite

Gerson J., (2005) “TEACHER RESPONSE TO NON-NATIVE SELECTION ERRORS IN COLLEGE- LEVEL ESL FRESHMAN COMPOSITION”, Journal of Second Language Acquisition and Teaching 12(0). p.63-77.

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Authors

Jessica Gerson (University of Arizona)

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

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This article has been peer reviewed.

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