At the Border between Egypt and Nubia: Skeletal Material from El-Hesa Cemetery 2

Abstract

In 1924, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York acquired a large collection of both archaeological and documentary material that had belonged to Austrian medical doctor, anthropologist and collector Felix von Luschan. Colloquially termed "The von Luschan Collection", a large portion of this collection consisted of human skeletal remains. Of these remains there are currently 339 individuals designated to the "el-Hesa" sub-collection, which is mainly made up of cranial and associated postcranial elements.

Uncovered in 1907 at Cemetery 2 of el-Hesa, one of the islands of the first cataract of the Nile, this skeletal collection illustrates the difficulties of using osteological material coming from Nubia, at the edge of the Egyptian territory. In particular, physical anthropologists continue to use outdated chronologies when discussing the age of the collection. This review of the el-Hesa collection provides an updated historical context for the remains, including new evidence dating them from the Late Roman period to the beginning of the Christian era.

How to Cite

Francigny, V. & de Voogt, A. & Kahn, J. & Harcourt-Smith, W., (2014) β€œAt the Border between Egypt and Nubia: Skeletal Material from El-Hesa Cemetery 2”, Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections 6(1), p.5-10. doi: https://doi.org/10.2458/azu_jaei_v06i1_harcourt-smith

1909

Views

178

Downloads

Share

Authors

Vincent Francigny (American Museum of Natural History, New York)
Alex de Voogt (American Museum of Natural History, New York)
Joanna Kahn (American Museum of Natural History, New York)
William Harcourt-Smith (American Museum of Natural History, New York)

Download

Issue

Publication details

Dates

Licence

All rights reserved

Identifiers

Peer Review

This article has been peer reviewed.

File Checksums (MD5)

  • PDF: c1fa97b10cfba6713939478d2f32b911